The 10 major GDPR misconceptions

posted in: GDPR, GDPR Misconceptions | 0

This post is also available in: Deutsch (German)

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

The GDPR generated an enormous amount of expenditure until the end of May 2018. It has led to a host of more or less serious lawyers and consultants writing contracts, guidelines and agreements. Why should we be interested? I’m claiming that both software vendors and service providers that process personal data have increased the price of their products by an estimated 25% this year. By next year at the latest, we will be presented with this invoice as customers – product prices will rise. The user (or the “data subject” in the jargon of the GDPR) asks himself: What do I really get for it? Even the echo in the press was unique. Seldom has a law thrown such high waves. The GDPR is a content-related monster and anyone who claims to have understood all of it either has a very high error tolerance or is satisfied with understanding the most important basic principles (quote from the Internet community: “Chuck Norris has already implemented the GDPR twice – completely!”). Instead of dealing with the content and real risks, isolated actions were launched. A good example of this is the request to renew the newsletter subscription, which is superfluous in 90% of all cases. Such actions, mostly emerging out of nowhere, have partly developed senseless and superfluous dynamics of their own. If we look a little beyond the end of our nose, then we must in any case ask ourselves whether the current data protection concept, as the European Union wants to exemplify it, is really future-oriented. I mean: No. In order to justify this, I have listed the most important misconceptions of the GDPR and published them over the last 6 month.  

 

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